FAA assigned Curaçao and Sint Maarten Cat. 2 safety rating

January 20, 2012

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced that Curaçao and Sint Maarten do not comply with international safety standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), based on an assessment of each country’s civil aviation authority.

As a result, the FAA has assigned both Curaçao and Sint Maarten an International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) Category 2 rating. With a Category 2 rating, Curaçao and Sint Maarten air carriers will not be allowed to establish new service to the United States, but can continue existing service. Both countries were previously part of the Netherlands Antilles, which had a Category 1 rating.

A Category 2 rating means a country either lacks laws or regulations necessary to oversee air carriers in accordance with minimum international standards, or that its civil aviation authority – equivalent to the FAA for aviation safety matters – is deficient in one or more areas, such as technical expertise, trained personnel, record keeping or inspection procedures.

As part of the FAA’s IASA program, the agency assesses the civil aviation authorities of all countries with air carriers that operate or have applied to fly to the United States and makes that information available to the public. The assessments determine whether or not foreign civil aviation authorities are meeting ICAO safety standards, not FAA regulations.

Countries with air carriers that fly to the United States must adhere to the safety standards of ICAO, the United Nations’ technical agency for aviation that establishes international standards and recommended practices for aircraft operations and maintenance.

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Russian ramp checks find 24 serious safety issues

October 21, 2011

The Russian Department of State oversight of civil aviation, Gosavianadzor conducted a total of 279 “ramp checks”  of civil aircraft of the Russian Federation during the month of September 2011. The results of checks on 150 aircraft revealed 311 comments, including 24 observations that affected flight safety (Category 3).

The following aircraft were temporarily grounded until the issues were resolved:

  • Kogalymavia Airbus A320 TC-KLA;
  • Grozny-Avia Yakovlev 42D RA-42418;
  • Gazprom Avia Yakovlev 42D RA-42451;
  • Izhavia Yakovlev 42D RA-42459;
  • Izhavia Yakovlev 42D RA-42385;
  • Tulpar Air Yakovlev 42D RA-42408;
  • Krasava Yakovlev 42D RA-42370;
  • Kuban Airlines Yakovlev 42D RA-42331;
  • Kuban Airlines Yakovlev 42D RA-42342;
  • Saravia Yakovlev 42D RA-42378;
  • UTair-Express Antonov 24RV RA-46494;
  • UTair ATR-42 VP-BLJ.

FAA raises safety rating for Croatia

January 28, 2011

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)  announced that Croatia complies with international safety standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), based on the results of a reassessment of Croatia’s civil aviation authority.

Croatiahas made significant progress and is now upgraded from the Category 2 safety rating the country received in September 2008 to Category 1.

A Category 1 rating means the country’s civil aviation authority complies with ICAO standards. A Category 2 rating means a country either lacks laws or regulations necessary to oversee air carriers in accordance with minimum international standards, or that its civil aviation authority – equivalent to the FAA for aviation safety matters – is deficient in one or more areas, such as technical expertise, trained personnel, recordkeeping or inspection procedures.

With the International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) Category 2 rating, Croatian air carriers could not establish new service to the United States. Now with the Category 1 rating, Croatian air carriers will be able to establish new service to the United States.

As part of the FAA’s IASA program, the agency assesses the civil aviation authorities of all countries with air carriers that operate or have applied to fly to the United States and makes that information available to the public. The assessments determine whether or not foreign civil aviation authorities are meeting ICAO safety standards, not FAA regulations.

Countries with air carriers that fly to the United States must adhere to the safety standards of ICAO, the United Nations’ technical agency for aviation that establishes international standards and recommended practices for aircraft operations and maintenance.


Danish national audit office notes safety oversight improvement

August 13, 2010

The Danish National Audit Office published follow-up report on their 2006 safety oversight audit of the country’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), noting several improvements.

The office lauded the CAA for creating a supervisory planning system, improving the database which CAA uses as basis for inspection plans and inspection reports.

Also, the Ministry of Transport now receives information about the STK’s oversight activities.  Sandinavisk Tilsynskontor (STK) is a joint inspection office between the three Scandinavian civil aviation authorities.

Yet, the offices notes that SAS Scandinavian Airlines still carried out “irregular flights”, flights that were carried out without performing inspections required by 20 different airworthiness directives (ADs).

According to the Danish CAA SAS performed 11,114 irregular flight during the 2006-2009 period: 2331 in 2006, 2788 in 2007, 3714 in 2008 and 2281 in 2009. This number should be significantly reduced after completion of the anticipated reorganization of supervision by mid 2010.


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