Report: Turkish Airlines B737-800 Schiphol accident report released

The Dutch Safety Board released its final report regarding their investigation into the fatal accident involving a Turkish Airlines Boeing 737-800 near Amsterdam-Schiphol Airport.

The Dutch Safety Board has reached the following main conclusion:
During the accident flight, while executing the approach by means of the instrument landing system with the right autopilot engaged, the left radio altimeter system showed an incorrect height of -8 feet on the left primary flight display. This incorrect value of -8 feet resulted in activation of the ‘retard flare’ mode of the autothrottle, whereby the thrust of both engines was reduced to a minimal value (approach idle) in preparation for the last phase of the landing. Due to the approach heading and altitude provided to the crew by air traffic control, the localizer signal was intercepted at 5.5 NM from the runway threshold with the result that the glide slope had to be intercepted from above. This obscured the fact that the autothrottle had entered the retard flare mode. In addition, it increased the crew’s workload. When the aircraft passed 1000 feet height, the approach was not stabilised so the crew should have initiated a go around. The right autopilot (using data from the right radio altimeter) followed the glide slope signal. As the airspeed continued to drop, the aircraft’s pitch attitude kept increasing. The crew failed to recognise the airspeed decay and the pitch increase until the moment the stick shaker was activated. Subsequently the approach to stall recovery procedure was not executed properly, causing the aircraft to stall and crash.

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5 Responses to Report: Turkish Airlines B737-800 Schiphol accident report released

  1. firouzi says:

    if this is considered the final conclusion,i deeply feel regret.
    if captain was aware of malfunctioning RA no 1 he should have relied on primary digital altimeter and also could have disregarded the use of autothrottle which terminated in a catastrophi

  2. Fred A says:

    This shows that incompetency, the main cause of human error-related accidents like this one is not limited to US regional airlines!

    Lack of situational awareness, tantamount to complacency and reliance of automation is apparently becoming more than an aberration!

  3. F/E koblan alsakarneh says:

    This report indicates ignorance , may be arrogance from the flight crew in sevaral areas , As if both radio altimeters are not agreeing for auto land is forbidden according to MEL . 5.5 miles intercept distance is too short to be well established for the auto land , also inercepting to the glide has to be from below not from above with maximum of 45 degs intercept angle.
    Further more the airplane kept on bleeding speed without the crew noticing till they hit the dirty satll, where is the CRM and the stabilized approach procdures.
    Yet when they hit the stall where is the stall recovery procedure to be carried out?
    This is concidered shameful accident , i feel sorry for the insurance company .

  4. Bgd A says:

    National Geographic series explains pretty much the accident.

    Have not heard of any Boeing fix. It would be nice to know that all instruments are now correct. 😐

  5. Dan says:

    THIS SEEMS LIKE A HUGE MIDESIGING OF THE A/T AND AUTOLAND FUNCTIONALITIES: SINGLE LEFT CHANNEL COMMANDING A/T WITHOUT ANY DATA VALIDATION AND SINGLE RIGHT CHANNEL PERFORMING AUTOLAND; WHILE LEFT WAS REDUCING THE ENGINE THE RIGHT WAS INCREASING THE ANGLE OF ATTACK, THE ONLY MITIGATION REMAINING THE STICK SHAKER PROBABLY WITHOUT ANY STICK PUSHER. BET THE FHA TAKES CREDIT FOR PILOT ACTION AND WONDER HOW THAT FAA IS STILL ALLOWING THIS ?

    ps-”it would be nice to know that all instruments are now correct….” i don;t mind explaining you that no instrument has a failure probability better that 10-5/hour, in reality maybe 10-4 which means that single channel architectures like the one on this boeing do not work

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