Report: UK Safety Performance detailing U.K. safety statistics 2000-2009

The U.K. Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) published a statistical review of aviation safety, titled “UK Safety Performance” (CAP 800).

The document provides statistics on the safety of UK aviation between 2000 and 2009, covering reportable and fatal accidents, serious incidents and occurrences as a whole.Information is provided for UK public transport, UK non-public transport, UK airspace and UKaerodromes, large and small aeroplanes, helicopters, airships, balloons, gliders, gyroplanesand microlights.

There were 113 reportable accidents involving large UK public transport aeroplanes between 2000 and 2009. The most common type of accident was a ramp incident, followed by abnormal runway contact or runway excursion. Three accidents involved fatalities to aircraft occupants, with a total of five fatalities. One accident involved a third party fatality.

The reportable accident rate over the period as a whole was 9.8 per million flights, and the fatal accident rate was 0.3 per million flights. Grouping aircraft into jets, business jets and turboprops, the group most commonly involved in a reportable accident was jet aircraft, but they had the lowest accident rate at 9.1 per million flights. By contrast, business jets were involved in the least number of reportable accidents but had the highest accident rate at 19.4 per million flights.

In addition to the five on-board fatalities and one third-party fatality, there were 15 serious injuries and 44 minor injuries.

There were 179 serious incidents, of which aircraft technical failure/malfunction was the most common type of serious incident, followed by in-flight fire/smoke/fumes. The serious incident rate was 15.7 per million flights, and was highest for turboprop aircraft at 20.1 per million flights.

Overall, there were 49,000 occurrences involving large UK public transport aeroplanes and the annual number of these occurrences increased by 20% in the ten year period. Accidents and Serious Incidents form less than 1% of the total number of occurrences.

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